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Building Regulations for replacement UPVC windows

All our windows are supplied with low energy glass, which is normally Pilkington K double glazing, or equivalent. The main thrust of the April 2002 Building Regulations was to ensure that the thermal efficiency was standardised at a U value of 1.8. This is know as ‘Part L’ of the Building Regulations.


In late 2010 all of the laws and regulations in place for double glazing changed again and now all new windows sold to customers will be supplied with an energy rating certificate. This will help you to see how much energy you are saving by having new double glazing installed into your home.


When you first look at ordering your double glazing, it’s important that you know all the regulations which might impact on what UPVC windows you can have in your home.


The regulations are split into parts. Part L1 is for the glass U value.


Building Regulation part N is regarding safety toughened glass. Windows below 800mm or 31.5” from the floor level of the room must contain toughened safety glass. You can specify toughened safety glass in each window, if required, when you order your windows online.

 
Part B regards fire safety and escape routes. Your replacement window must be no worse than the old window in regards to fire exit. You can order fire escape hinges on side-hung windows when you order windows online.

Part F – the ventilation in the new window must be no worse than the one it replaces. Again, you can specify background trickle ventilation when you order your windows online. This is a must-have in wet rooms, kitchens, bathrooms, etc, because they can be opened to allow warm air to exit, which makes them a useful aid in preventing condensation.
The regulations say that the new double glazing replacement windows must be no worse than the old windows they are replacing.

For example if the outgoing windows contained trickle vents, the replacement windows must include them. There are no exceptions. The window openings must be the same or better than the outgoing windows. The openings cannot be made any smaller. Side window openings cannot be replaced by top openings over fixed windows.

Porches and conservatories - windows and doors that don’t face the outside of your home are exempt from part L1, i.e. French doors opening from the house into a conservatory. Windows in outbuildings are also exempt.

If you are having an extension built or building a house, you will need to apply for planning permission.